186 Comments

The whole problem here is that this school was founded on the premise that you can abuse a child into submission. The Seventh Day Adventists are one of the 2 surviving subsects of the Millerites - the other is the Jehovah's Witnesses... Both sects demand perfect submission from adults and naturally from children. I wonder how many of the survivors of this 'school' are practicing Seventh Day Adventists? I wonder how many of them still speak to their parents?

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"In fact, staffers were given handcuffs to use on kids as young as six."

Where do you find handcuffs small enough for 6 years old children ? Who are the sadistic assholes who sell them ?

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The new victims saw the first settlement and thought about a payout? As if that settlement was much after lawyer fees and splitting it between the plaintiffs. As was said by someone trying to make it more difficult to bring these cases to court, no amount of money would that can make up for what happened to them, but damn, that doesn’t make it alright to keep them from seeking justice at all.

Insurance is about risk management, your insurance program sucked at risk management because it believed religious people were inherently good, and now you’re facing the consequences of that. Perhaps the state should have poked its nose into the school’s business a little better, then you could have caught this sooner. You’re reaping what you sowed. Don’t further punish future victims because you fucked up.

My local paper had an editorial letter that was praising school choice yesterday. I wanted to scream at the author that this is what you get when you advocate for that. School choice is only about defunding public schools and these “at risk youth” programs are all about further victimization of vulnerable and previously victimized children. They are at risk of you preying on them.

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Maybe the State shouldn't be involved in insuring private schools, or at least provide oversite.

I'm not sure why insurance should pay out for criminal activity.

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I keep saying it: Religion (Christianity in this country in particular) needs to be 21-and-over. No children allowed. It might just save a lot of tragedy.

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Aug 30, 2023·edited Aug 30, 2023

𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑠𝑡𝑎𝑓𝑓 𝑚𝑒𝑚𝑏𝑒𝑟𝑠 𝑤𝑒𝑟𝑒 𝑠𝑎𝑖𝑑 𝑡𝑜 ℎ𝑎𝑣𝑒 𝑎 “𝑑𝑖𝑣𝑖𝑛𝑒 𝑐𝑜𝑚𝑚𝑖𝑠𝑠𝑖𝑜𝑛..."

Warning sign 1: practicioners that should be showing you their license, talk about their 'calling' instead.

𝑠𝑡𝑎𝑓𝑓𝑒𝑟𝑠 𝑤𝑒𝑟𝑒 𝑔𝑖𝑣𝑒𝑛 ℎ𝑎𝑛𝑑𝑐𝑢𝑓𝑓𝑠 𝑡𝑜 𝑢𝑠𝑒 𝑜𝑛 𝑘𝑖𝑑𝑠 𝑎𝑠 𝑦𝑜𝑢𝑛𝑔 𝑎𝑠 𝑠𝑖𝑥.

Warning sign 2-infinite. Unless the practicioner you are contracting with is a police officer, security guard, or dominatrix, stop employing them (and tell them to leave) at "carries handcuffs".

𝑡ℎ𝑎𝑡 𝑙𝑎𝑤 𝑚𝑎𝑦 𝑛𝑜𝑤 𝑏𝑒 𝑖𝑛 𝑗𝑒𝑜𝑝𝑎𝑟𝑑𝑦 𝑡𝑜𝑜, 𝑏𝑒𝑐𝑎𝑢𝑠𝑒 𝑀𝑖𝑟𝑎𝑐𝑙𝑒 𝑀𝑒𝑎𝑑𝑜𝑤𝑠 𝑆𝑐ℎ𝑜𝑜𝑙 𝑤𝑎𝑠 𝑖𝑛𝑠𝑢𝑟𝑒𝑑 𝑏𝑦 𝑎 𝑠𝑡𝑎𝑡𝑒-𝑟𝑢𝑛 𝑎𝑔𝑒𝑛𝑐𝑦, 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑡ℎ𝑎𝑡 𝑎𝑔𝑒𝑛𝑐𝑦 𝑖𝑠 𝑛𝑜𝑤 𝑤𝑜𝑟𝑟𝑖𝑒𝑑 𝑖𝑡 𝑤𝑜𝑛’𝑡 ℎ𝑎𝑣𝑒 𝑒𝑛𝑜𝑢𝑔ℎ 𝑚𝑜𝑛𝑒𝑦 𝑡𝑜 𝑑𝑒𝑎𝑙 𝑤𝑖𝑡ℎ 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑎𝑏𝑢𝑠𝑒 𝑝𝑎𝑦𝑜𝑢𝑡𝑠.

Well I don't have any advice on how to fix the shortfall caused by past idiocy, but there are two obvious future solutions. The first is to actually do the job you are supposed to do, and only certify a school to operate when the staff is accredited, licensed, has the proper facilities and resources, etc. Once you've accopmlished that, the second is for the legislature to require its' state insurance agencies to get reinsurance. But you gotta do the first first, because if you just go out and try and get reinsurance without demonstrating that you do your job, no reinsurer is going to want to touch you.

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There STILL is no hate like Christian Love™, is there? Also, consider:

𝐶𝑙𝑎𝑟𝑘 “𝑝𝑙𝑒𝑎𝑑𝑒𝑑 𝑔𝑢𝑖𝑙𝑡𝑦 𝑡𝑜 𝑐ℎ𝑖𝑙𝑑 𝑛𝑒𝑔𝑙𝑒𝑐𝑡, 𝑓𝑎𝑖𝑙𝑢𝑟𝑒 𝑡𝑜 𝑟𝑒𝑝𝑜𝑟𝑡 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑜𝑏𝑠𝑡𝑟𝑢𝑐𝑡𝑖𝑜𝑛 𝑜𝑓 𝑗𝑢𝑠𝑡𝑖𝑐𝑒, 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑟𝑒𝑐𝑒𝑖𝑣𝑒𝑑 𝑎 𝑠𝑖𝑥-𝑚𝑜𝑛𝑡ℎ 𝑗𝑎𝑖𝑙 𝑠𝑒𝑛𝑡𝑒𝑛𝑐𝑒 𝑎𝑙𝑜𝑛𝑔 𝑤𝑖𝑡ℎ 𝑓𝑖𝑣𝑒 𝑦𝑒𝑎𝑟𝑠 𝑜𝑓 𝑝𝑟𝑜𝑏𝑎𝑡𝑖𝑜𝑛.”

That's it? Six lousy months of incarceration, by comparison with how long various of their victims spent in those isolation rooms? Certainly the $100 million in fines and penalties will leave an impression on Clark and her cronies, but jail time, at least in my mind, would utterly seal the deal.

One other thing: why don't I see this on Norah O'Donnell or Lester Holt's rundown? This is the kind of Christian malfeasance which needs to be on the national news, to let people know just how terrific "Christian Love" really is.

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I’m not sure this torture was even about control. It’s more like pure sadism, cruelty for the pleasure of inflicting cruelty.

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Aug 30, 2023·edited Aug 30, 2023

When people become convinced they're operating under divine sanction, they can justify any horror. In my view, the parents are fully culpable for what was done to their children in the name of God. If there is an upside here, it that this school almost certainly created a new generation of atheists.

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Considering that the reasons listed for sending kids to that hellhole include such innocuous things as fibbing, disobedience, and *𝘤𝘩𝘦𝘤𝘬𝘴 𝘯𝘰𝘵𝘦𝘴* "Jesusing with insufficient gusto," I dare say that someone needs to take a good hard look at the 𝘱𝘢𝘳𝘦𝘯𝘵𝘴 involved, as well. If they're willing to ship their offspring off to torture camp for not being perfect little cross-kissing automatons, what sick shit did they try 𝘣𝘦𝘧𝘰𝘳𝘦 that to force the kids back in line?

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Need to stay away from this post for a few hours. I am too angry and it's not good for me right now.

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“There’s no money that can make that up for what happened to them. But we also have to take a look at the security of the state and the coffers of the state to be able to pay to operate.”

For some nutty reason the words "due diligence" come to mind. It is certainly incumbent on insurers--and most definitely on STATE, i.e. public insurers to, er, make certain that the entities they're insuring comply with all relevant laws and regulations. If the state insured this horrible school with no due diligence or oversight, probably because it was "christian," I'd say that's just too fucking bad for the state government and the taxpayers (most of whom would likely have had no problem with it--believe me, I know WV).

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Maybe it's just me, but it seems like what the state should do is actually start providing oversight to these "fix your kids" Christian schools.

We've heard over and over the tales of abuse at these places, which often seem to be little more than institutionalized victim factories. Sure, there are places that help troubled kids in need of guidance without abuse; I'm not saying otherwise. I'm saying that too often, because society perceives "Christian" as good, when these places are religiously motivated they just don't get the same scrutiny as nonreligious organizations. The inconsistency is the problem here, not just the religious piety that makes these folks think they can do it better. It makes me very nervous when someone claims they don't need oversight because of how religiously moral they are; it seems that we inevitably find out a few years later they were committing some sort of crime and just didn't want to be punished for it.

Provide oversight to everyone or don't bother at all. This middle of the road stuff is only making it worse.

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Aug 30, 2023·edited Aug 30, 2023

Was anyone from this Christian hellhole arrested for these crimes against children? If not, why not?

It seems all the wrong people were put in handcuffs.

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6 mos for the woman in charge and zero for anyone else doing the actual crimes; that is pathetic. We need to wake up to the horrors that are happening, in our country, in the name of this mythical God, even if you don't think he is mythical. First step is to remove all mention of or symbols of any and all religions from our government, public places and schools. Second, none of our tax dollars should be going to any religious school (Separation of Religious Organizations and State), nor any private school. We need to improve our public schools, from improving our teachers, hours spent to the curriculum nationwide. A child in Florida should get the same education as a child in California. I was hoping after Trump this would have been one of our top priorities.

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